The Evolving Role of Monomethyl Fumarate Treatment as Pharmacotherapy for Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-6-2024

Publication Title

Cureus

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS) worldwide. Multiple sclerosis involves inflammatory demyelination of nerve fibers in the CNS, often presenting with recurrent episodes of focal sensory or motor deficits associated with the region of the CNS affected. The prevalence of this disease has increased rapidly over the last decade. Despite the approval of many new pharmaceutical therapies in the past 20 years, there remains a growing need for alternative therapies to manage the course of this disease. Treatments are separated into two main categories: management of acute flare versus long-term prevention of flares via disease-modifying therapy. Primary drug therapies for acute flare include corticosteroids to limit inflammation and symptomatic management, depending on symptoms. Several different drugs have been recently approved for use in modifying the course of the disease, including a group of medications known as fumarates (e.g., dimethyl fumarate, diroximel fumarate, monomethyl fumarate) that have been shown to be efficacious and relatively safe. In the present investigation, we review available evidence focused on monomethyl fumarate, also known as Bafiertam®, along with bioequivalent fumarates for the long-term treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

First Page

e57714

PubMed ID

38711693

Volume

16

Issue

4

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